Posted on: October 16, 2020 Posted by: Children Health Mag Comments: 0

When wildfires struck the West Coast in September 2020, there was a lot for parents to worry about. For parents of children with asthma, though, the danger could be even greater. “There are more than 400 toxins that are present in wildfire smoke. That can activate the immune system in ways that aren’t helpful by both causing an inflammatory response and distracting the immune system from fighting infection,” says Amy Oro, MD, a pediatrician at Stanford Children’s Health. “When smoke enters into the lungs, it causes irritation and muscle spasms of the smooth muscle that is around the small breathing tubes in the lungs. This can lead to difficulty with breathing and wheezing. It’s really difficult on the lungs.”

With the added concern of COVID-19 and the effect it can have on breathing, many parents feel unsure about how to keep their children protected. The good news is that there are steps parents can take to keep their children as healthy as possible.

Here are tips parents need to know about how to deal with poor air quality when your child has asthma.

Minimize smoke exposure.

Especially when the air quality index reaches dangerous levels, it’s best to stay indoors as much as possible. You can find out your area’s AQI at AirNow.gov. An under 50 rating is the safest, but between 100-150 is considered unhealthy for sensitive groups, such as children with asthma. “If you’re being
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